The AHAA Conference began this week in Miami and I assume you have heard that they have expanded their Board of Directors and added an Advisory Board that include clients, media and research executives, besides just ad agency executives.
They also do not want to call the organization the Association of Hispanic Advertising Agencies, they want to be called AHAA - The Voice of Hispanic Marketing. A new COMPASS! I have high HOPES. This new change will impact the scope and breath of AHAA as we lead into 2013.

In 1996, AHAA was founded to grow our marketplace and promote our member agencies. Today Hispanic marketing is more important, more challenging and more nuanced. Gene Bryan -

Several months ago in October of 2011 I wrote an op-ed piece titled “I have high hopes for the Association of Hispanic Advertising Agencies”.

 

It was necessary to write last year’s op-ed piece since I felt after working with AHAA for fifteen years, the momentum and directionality of our Industry’s trade-marketing association did not represent the needs or that it was not a compass for our Industry. 

By Jose Villa / Sensis We hear the term “multicultural” a lot. Marketers, academics, and industry leaders love to talk about multicultural groups and the growth of America’s multicultural population — the various minority groups, including Hispanic, African-American, Asian, and “other” (Middle Eastern, European, South Asian, etc.) that are rapidly expanding in size and influence.

By Xavier Mantilla | Director of Sales - RedMas In the last 24 months we have seen a shift in the way brands and general market media agencies have come together to work with Hispanic media companies in order to reach these valued consumers. However there are huge shifts in behavior that most of us that work in the media space are yet to face. For a long time we always used terms like “targeted content” to mean Spanish language media (planning and buying), however, when we spend upwards of 90% of our budgets on Spanish language only

By Joe Castro - Zubi Advertising I never sleep better than during the holidays that now seem a faded distant memory. The new year has brought with it the reality of potentially great political change on the horizon, and with all the political rhetoric a reawakening to the disturbing truth of how Hispanics are viewed by many other Americans in this country.

By Joe Zubizarreta / Zubi Advertising - Zubination Having just watched the pilot for Rob Schneider’s new show, Rob, I am totally disgusted by the way CBS has portrayed a Mexican-American family in an attempt to lure Latinos to general market television. The only thing I can think of is that they wanted to use every stereotype in the book to generate non-Hispanic viewership.

As many of you have seen in the movie 2012 and have heard from scholars based on their interpretation of Mayan culture and the Mayan calendar, the world will end December 2012. Doomsday is upon us in 355 days on December 21, 2012.

On December 14, organizers of one of the nation’s premier live music events, the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, revealed the lineup for its 2012 extravaganza. Presented by Shell, “Jazz Fest” has become a two-weekend celebration of the best in American music. It has far outgrown its own name, and over the years has welcomed headline rock acts to the big stages.

It’s Ho! Ho! Ho! time, party time and looking to next year.  So with that said, here are my Top 10 pet peeves for 2012. 1- Professionals in our Industry need to understand the need to return calls and e-mails.  It is just proper business etiquette, even if there is not an opportunity to do business.  People need communication and have to deliver communication back to their people.  Two-way street.  Return your own calls, don't have you assistant do it.  Nobody, and I mean nobody is that important or that busy.

As of late I'm hearing in Hispanic communications circles much ado about whether or not marketers should pay Latino bloggers for posting brand-related content, product reviews, etc. While this topic has been fully addressed in mainstream circles, the issues take on greater complexities in the Latino blogosphere.

  Carat USA and Aegis Media - Multi-Cultural Marketing released the finding of their new Hispanic Consumer Connections research study that according to them reveals that 90 percent of Hispanic media budgets

  Over the last couple of years, mainstream ad agencies have tried to create specialty Hispanic or multicultural hybrids, division within division and /or attempted to put together people within to say they have the mul

According to Tony Ruiz - Managing Partner at New York based The Vidal Partnership, he stated yesterday at Broadcasting and Cable's - Multicultural TV Summit that the current levels of Hispanic targeted ad budgets and the fact that we need to m

  By Julio Rumbaut.

Pages