By Gonzalo López Martí - Creative director, etc/LMMiami.com

  • I guess everything that could be said about the Nikaepernick salvo has already been voiced, written and memed.
  • Want my personal opinion?
  • It was a genius marketing move.

The promise of digital marketing is very exciting: delivering the right message to the right person in the right place and at the right time. In marketers' quest for this holy grail, much attention and budget has been focused on the media side of the equation (i.e., the person, time, and place).

The mission is to create a system that puts content in front of a consumer at just the right moment. But all your work stands or falls on what happens then, and success is no accident. It’s the result of delivering content that communicates exactly the right message, for that particular consumer, at that moment in time. Helping to set the stage for this is your messaging framework.

In working with many award-winning agencies over the course of my career, one of the challenges I encounter is how to translate awards into compelling messages for new business development. The most common roadblock is connecting an award to business results for the agency client.  by Mark Duval / Duval Partnership

Jesus Ramirez founder and Executive Creative Director of San Antonio based Cartel Creativo with Victoria Murphy Hudson has passed.

As marketers, we’ve spent decades leaning on the double definition of “creative” to shirk responsibility. We’ve conflated the traditional creativity of artists, writers, and poets, with the creative side of marketing and advertising — the copywriting, art design, and campaign content.

In a previous post I mentioned that there were some disturbing trends lurking in WARC’s analysis of campaign trends from this year’s Cannes Lions. To my mind those trends say a lot about the sorry state of marketing practice today.  by Nigel Hollis

Artificial intelligence (AI) is more than just a job-eliminating technology. It also has the potential to change how people approach creative work.

Emilio Guede Fernández, a pioneer of advertising film production in Puerto Rico, died in Miami last Saturday, July 28th, at the age 90. He was the founder of Guede Films, in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico, a company that opened up offices in New York to service the U.S. Hispanic Market and had offices in Guatemala, Colombia and Panama. Guede was a cinematographer who worked as director and photographer on many television spots for many ad agencies in Puerto Rico, Latin America and the United States. A list of his commercials or those produced by his company includes brands such as AT&T, Procter & Gamble, Colgate-Palmolive, McDonald’s, Kentucky Fried Chicken, Banco Popular and many others.

Transformation continues at a rapid pace for our industry and clients. One thing that remains constant is our commitment to creativity, big ideas and work that drives impressive results.

By Gonzalo López Martí - Creative director, etc / LMMiami.com

  • When you’ve been in the biz far too long -like yours truly- every time you confront an advertising execution of some sort you can see right through it: the stale “strategy”, the focus groups, the power point decks, the creative tropes, the tired gimmicks, the usual clichés.
  • Like any drug dealer would tell you, only fools consume their own product.

The California Milk Processor Board (CMPB), creator of got milk?, together with lead agency-of-record GALLEGOS United, is launching "You Can Always Count on Milk," a new $16-million-dollar, statewide advertising initiative. 

How have programmatic platforms and other new technologies disrupted the marketing creative process? In the new episode of eMarketer's "Behind the Numbers," we discuss some of the changes with guest Grant Munro, co-founder of Shutterstock Custom.

The Cannes Festival of Advertising, where Lions come from, may not have jumped the shark yet, but it’s headed that way. That’s important not just because the Lions are the Oscars of advertising, but because the festival itself is a mirror of our industry. This year’s look in the mirror gave a rather unflattering reflection. What happened?

The bilingual TV spots consist of three executions in which hardcore and novice soccer fans come together to enjoy the 2018 FIFA World Cup every morning over McDonald’s breakfast. As the tournament progresses our novice fans learn more about The Beautiful Game and even some Spanish along the way. World Cup commercials are seen very frequently over a one month period, so we created a series of spots that told a bigger story as a whole and rewarded the viewer with fresh executions throughout the tournament.

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