Marketers must work much more closely with academia to develop the kind of data and analytics talent that will be needed to fuel business growth and meet the challenges of a future, data-intense industry.

New data described in the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center's Completing College State Report shows a rise in the overall college completion rate in 43 out of the 45 states, for which data are available over the last five cohort years (2009-2013), and a narrowing of the top-to-bottom state completion rate gaps. Only Alabama and New Hampshire saw declines.

More than 23 million U.S. immigrants will be eligible to vote in the 2020 presidential election, making up roughly 10% of the nation’s overall electorate – both record highs, according to Pew Research Center estimates based on Census Bureau data.

The coronavirus outbreak is first and foremost a human tragedy, affecting hundreds of thousands of people. It is also having a growing impact on the global economy. This article is intended to provide business leaders with a perspective on the evolving situation and implications for their companies. The outbreak is moving quickly, and some of the perspectives in this article may fall rapidly out of date. This article reflects our perspective as of March 1, 2020. We will update it regularly as the outbreak evolves.

The outbreak of Coronavirus in countries around the world is a widening tragedy. Many aspects of life and business will be altered in many countries around the world with the possibility of a recession realistic for many countries, at least on a short-term basis. Shifts in media consumption and other behaviors are important to monitor, and marketers need to be mindful of opportunities to service consumers that may follow along with the media owners they buy from and the societies in which they operate.

Three-time Emmy Award-winning TV journalist María Celeste Arrarás and Cynthia Hudson, Senior VP and Managing Director of CNN en Español and Hispanic Strategy at CNN/US, will be honored with lifetime achievement awards Thursday at the 15th Anniversary Gala of Florida State University’s Center for Hispanic Marketing Communication.

Thanks to billionaire Michael Bloomberg, television ad spending in the 2020 presidential contest has spiked to unprecedented levels. Well over half a billion dollars ($626 million) has been spent so far, with Bloomberg splashing out more half the total ($333 million), and fellow billionaire Tom Steyer dropping another $157 million. Taken altogether, the Democrats have spent 96 percent of the total to date—with President Donald Trump’s essentially uncontested primary campaign spending a comparatively paltry $18 million dollars (and an outside group supporting his re-election kicking in an additional $4 million). In comparison, even with competitive contests in both parties, only $269 million (through 2/15/2016) had been spent at this point in 2016.

Education is often touted as the great equalizer that enables minorities from lower-income backgrounds to compete for a piece of the American Dream. Anecdotal accounts of Black or Hispanic children, from marginalized communities, “pulling themselves up by their bootstraps” and achieving great success find their way into impassioned speeches from teachers to preachers, politicians to business leaders.

This year, Latinos are expected for the first time to be the nation’s largest racial or ethnic minority in a U.S. presidential election, with a record 32 million projected to be eligible to vote. They will account for 13.3% of all eligible voters. However, the number of Latino eligible voters is still far below the 60 million Latinos who live in the country.

As the U.S. enters a heated 2020 presidential election year, a new Pew Research Center report finds that Republicans and Democrats place their trust in two nearly inverse news media environments.  

New words stick when they come from below, and respond to a real need.
 

A new report released by Lumina Foundation, Strada Education Network and Gallup finds that American adults without college degrees were most likely to withdraw from school because of their challenges in balancing the demands of school, employment and other responsibilities. These same barriers persist as the impediments to returning to school. Importantly, only 19% of these adults report they are no longer interested or don't need to complete their education.

The winner of the 2020 Presidential Election will need to reach 270 electoral votes. Getting to that number will mean understanding who's voting and who's not, and who can be engaged, so they'll turn out at the polls. Whether you want to engage in a "get out the vote" campaign, or focus messaging efforts in key swing states, you'll want to tune in each month as we explore voters and their role on the road to election 2020.

In 2018, 13.6% of counties had a statistically significant increase in median household income compared with 2007, the year before the most recent recession, while 5.5% had a statistically significant decrease, according to data released by the Census Bureau.

The number of people enrolled in school in the United States reached 76.8 million in 2018 according to the U.S. Census Bureau. This is 2.2 million below the level reached in 2011, when 79.0 million were enrolled in school. Enrolled students make up 25% of the U.S. population age 3 and older.

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