LATiNAS is a monthly magazine show that showcases LATINX women from all walks of life! As these influencers rapidly become an economic and social powerhouse in the United States, the program will showcase their power at home, in business and everywhere else in between. LATiNAS is hosted by EMMY® award winning multi-media journalist and author Tinabeth Piña.

NextGen Collective has partnered with Latina founders Karli Henriquez (Know Alias) and Brittany Chavez (Shop Latinx) to bring awareness of Latina Equal Pay Day on November 20, 2019—the day when Latina pay catches up to that of white, non-Hispanic men from the previous year.

 

 

While 27 percent of chief diversity officers find themselves still having to make the case for diversity, inclusion, and belonging in the workplace, the good news is that the majority of top leaders already understand how critical these efforts are. Indeed, in my work in talent and diversity at Google, Disney, and other large firms, I’ve found many leaders eager for actionable frameworks and advice to create more inclusive cultures. But again and again I find one thing plaguing their attempts: fear.    By Daisy Auger-Dominguez

The activism of Generation Z consumers puts them in a unique position to effect actual change at the business level in ways previous generations weren’t. By thinking beyond how to wield their individual spending power, Generation Z consumers are pushing their households and broader social networks to use the tools at their disposal—their purchasing power and choice of which media content creators and publishers to support—to create real change.

Hispanics represent the many voices that make up the tapestry of our country.

If you’re a woman in North America, the OECD estimates that you make $10,000 less than your male counterparts each year, and you’re charged between $1,300 and $2,135 more for products and services. It’s a gender fine that adds up to about half a million dollars over your lifetime—and that’s if you’re lucky. If you’re college-educated, a professional school graduate, a minority, or a Millennial, experts estimate that your gender fine ranges between $1 and $2 million.

Growing up in Puerto Rico, Ingrid Otero-Smart was so introverted she rarely spoke in school.  Yet as President and CEO of Casanova McCann, Otero-Smart runs one of the largest multicultural advertising shops in the country. The firm works with blue-chip clients including Nestlé, U.S. Army and the California Lottery. This year, it was the most-awarded U.S. Hispanic agency at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity, the second year in a row Casanova earned that recognition.  By Court Stroud

Financial independence is one of the many markers used to designate the crossover from childhood into young adulthood, and it’s a milestone most Americans (64%) think young adults should reach by the time they are 22 years old, according to a new Pew Research Center study. But that’s not the reality for most young adults who’ve reached this age.

Hispanic Access Foundation released its new short film "I Am Cheo," which explores the intersection of Latino culture and communities with the outdoors and climate issues, like wildfires, and emphasizes the need for engagement and action to preserve our future.

On the second anniversary of Hurricane Maria’s devastating impact on Puerto Rico, Richards / Lerma, a Dallas-based Hispanic ad agency announced the launch of a multi-media campaign supporting the efforts of a unified coalition created to intensify fundraising for the years-long effort to rebuild Puerto Rico.

The Latino Business Action Network (LBAN) has selected 77 scaled Latina and Latino businesses from across the country as part of the next, and seventh, cohort of the Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative Education-Scaling (SLEI-Ed) Program. The figure represents an all-time high engagement number since the program's inception in 2013.

The prestigious DMN Marketing Hall of Femme and Women to Watch program recognizes female marketers who have taken risks, pushed limits, and achieved standout success in their marketing careers.

In the hit ABC sitcom Black-ish, the main character, Andre "Dre" Johnson (Anthony Anderson), is an African-American who has risen from the 'hood to the upper middle class as an executive at a Los Angeles ad agency. While working at the agency, Dre must deal with a constant stream of racist remarks from his buffoonish white boss. Now, new research from the ANA Educational Foundation (AEF) suggests the creator and writers of Black-ish — although they exaggerate the situation for comedy's sake — are not far off in their portrayal of the world of advertising and marketing.

In his book, How to Succeed in Business without Being White, Earl Graves, founder of Black Enterprise magazine, recalls one of his early successes, a sales call to a vice president at Hertz.  He brought with him two of the heaviest hitters in the Civil Rights movement, Julian Bond and John Lewis, both Georgia legislators, demanding that the Hertz VP “show his appreciation and awareness of his loyal African American customers” by buying multiple full-page ads over a period of several months.  The tactic worked.    By David Morse / New America Dimensions

The theme for this year’s International Women’s Day is #BalanceforBetter underpinned by the idea that balance drives a better working world. For years, we have heard that gender inequality must be addressed in order for economies and businesses to prosper. In fact, the United Nations includes gender equality as one of the Sustainable Development Goals—the foundations for a peaceful, prosperous and sustainable world.

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