ctor, director, producer, writer and Latinx activist, John Leguizamo joins Jack and Mike this week to discuss his directorial feature debut, 'Critical Thinking.' Based on the true story of a group of Brown and Black Miami chess-students, who with the guidance of their teacher (Leguizamo), forged together a friendship that would propel them from the bottom of the rankings to the National Chess Championship.

Over the past several months, you’ve heard us say over and over: online hate turns into harm in real life. From advocating for the ban of white supremacists on social media platforms, to leading an advertising boycott against Facebook for profiteering off of hate, NHMC is as committed as ever to eliminating hate online. This year we’ve also ramped up our policy work to stop misinformation campaigns and to protect Latinx Digital Rights and the sanctity of our democracy.

A McKinsey Global Institute report finds that $12 trillion could be added to global GDP by 2025 by advancing women’s equality. The public, private, and social sectors will need to act to close gender gaps in work and society.

While this year’s Emmy Awards had a 33% increase in Black nominees, there were still many groups who were underrepresented or not recognized at all. To mark the importance of such recognition moving forward, ANA’s Alliance for Inclusive and Multicultural Marketing – AIMM – partnered with Billy Porter, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Daniel Dae Kim, Isis King, Jamie Chung and Nicole Scherzinger to create a PSA challenging the entertainment industry to increase diverse and accurate cultural representation in programming and advertising. An extension of AIMM’s #SeeALL movement, television viewers are being driven to participate through a dedicated social campaign.

Tony Hernandez founder of the Immigrant Archive Project (IAP) and Daniel Godoy resume the storytelling of Immigrants in the USA.

 

y now, most people who have attended a wealthy college — or those who tuned into the Democratic presidential debates — have likely heard or seen the word “Latinx.” The anglicized Spanish term is the latest attempt of gender activists to impose their perverse ideology on the rest of the culture — and on Spanish speakers in particular.

While some have embraced Latinx, there has been push back from Latinos in the U.S.

What is good for gender equality is good for the economy and society as well. The COVID-19 pandemic puts that truth into stark relief and raises critically important choices.

For my last series of articles, I decided to focus on us, women, and how we interact in the workplace.  My intention with this series is to dive deep into the dynamics that have made women successful – and not successful— in working together with different types of women.  By Roxana Lissa

Crayola believes every child should be able to creatively and accurately color themselves into the world they see around them. Crayola launched Colors of the World crayons – 24 new specially formulated crayons – designed to mirror and represent over 40 global skin tones across the world. With the Colors of the World crayons, Crayola hopes to cultivate a more inclusive world for children of all ages, races, cultures and ethnicities.

As more states loosen their stay-at-home orders, a study released by the Network of Executive Women (NEW) and Hispanic marketing platform Latinarrific prompts interesting questions regarding whether the COVID-19 pandemic will ultimately reverse or accelerate corporate America's Latina leadership crisis.

Republica partnered with Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden to launch Earth Unplugged, an Organic Ambisonic Album Starring Mother Nature.

During this time of uncertainty due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Grammy Award Winner, Pitbull has risen to action by creating a genuinely encouraging message of hope and faith, designed to invoke a sense of positivity and strength in people of all ages. "I Believe That We Will Win (World Anthem)" is a song of much-needed inspiration for humanity!

Ample research shows that leadership makes the greatest difference when the world around us is uncertain, and we are unsure about what lies ahead. We also know that the impact will be greatest when it comes not only from the apex but also from the middle ranks and front lines, writes Michael Useem in this opinion piece. Useem is faculty director of the Leadership Center and McNulty Leadership Program at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, and author of books on leadership during crisis.

You’re sitting in a meeting and your ideas are going unheard. You’re just as qualified as your colleagues, but you’re feeling undervalued. On top of that, you’re trying to balance work commitments, a sick child at home, helping your elderly parent, keeping up with your children’s schedules—the list goes on. And as you sit in that meeting, you think “What’s the point? Is this all really worth it? I’m fighting to push my career ahead and feeling stressed out. It’s just not worth it.” The good news is that women are no longer alone. Companies and brands are starting to get it—and starting to understand that they can help.

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