The following is a transcript of remarks by the President honoring Cinco de Mayo:

THE PRESIDENT: Thank you all very much. Sientase.

Mexican workers recruited to work in the United States in the 1940s moved one step closer in their quest to receive pay that was deducted from their paychecks and never paid back.

Dr. Jeffrey Runge, Administrator of the U.S. Department of Transportation's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), unveiled the agency's new multicultural outreach web site.

Even though foreign guest workers represent just a tiny fraction of the overall civilian workforce, they contribute a significant amount to America's economy.

Data released last week by the U.S. Census Bureau show that incomes for the nation's households remained stable and poverty declined between 1999 and 2000.

Access to the FCC's Spanish-language consumer bulletins has become much easier with the launch of "Bienvenidos" the Consumer Information Bureau's (CIB) new homepage for Spanish-speaking consumers.

News that the Federal Communications Commission unanimously voted to issue a Notice of Proposed Rule Making to examine cross ownership restrictions was greeted with enthusiasm by officials at the Newspaper Association of America, which is fighting to have the ban repealed.

In the true spirit of America, the people of this nation from coast to coast are reacting to the recent terrorist attacks with courage and fervor.

A new national "umbrella group" for Hispanic/Latino service charities, The Hispanic United Fund, will make its debut later this month in the U.S. government's worldwide workplace charity fund drive, the Combined Federal Campaign.

This week marks the fifth anniversary of the signing of the 1996 welfare reform law, the Personal Responsibility and Work Reconciliation Act (PRWORA), legislation which has had an enormous impact on the Latino community, particularly among legal immigrants and the poor.

During a visit this week with his Mexican counterpart Vicente Fox, President George W. Bush is expected to sketch out the most sweeping immigration reform in 15 years, a plan that could legalize millions of undocumented workers.

The National Urban League, the National Council of La Raza, and the National Women's Law Center disputed claims by the Heritage Foundation that minorities and women would be better off if Social Security were privatized.

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission took an important step toward advancing ICO's proposal to bring broadband communications services to rural and underserved customers in the United States and around the world.

The 2000 census undercount could result in a federal funding loss of more than $4 billion in 31 states and the District of Columbia, with a majority of the funds lost ($3.6 billion) in 58 of the nation's largest counties over the next ten years, according to a report by PricewaterhouseCoopers.

The National Council of La Raza (NCLR) traditionally supports immigration policies that are generous, fair, and humane. In the area of immigration control, NCLR takes the position that, as a sovereign nation, the United States can and should control its borders.

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