Disney overtook Apple for the first time in MBLM's Brand Intimacy 2019 Study, which is the largest study of brands based on emotions. The two were followed by Amazon, which came in third. The top 10 was also increasingly dominated by media & entertainment brands, comprising four out of the 10, up from three last year. The remaining brands in the top 10 were: Chevrolet, Netflix, Harley-Davidson, PlayStation, YouTube, Ford and Chick-fil-A. Brand Intimacy is defined as the emotional science that measures the bonds we form with the brands we use and love.

Daren Poole, Global Head of Creative at Kantar, recently asked on Kantar’s Workplace what people thought of an article by Zac Martin, writing in Mumbrella, which tells us to not sweat the big idea. So, is the big idea dead, misunderstood, or as important as ever?  by Nigel Hollis

Price, not transparency or partnerships, remains the priority for clients when it comes to their agencies.

In the latest episode of "Behind the Numbers," we're talking about consumer trust in brands and digging into data from a survey by data platform Jebbit. We're joined in the studio by Jebbit co-founder Jonathan Lacoste to discuss which brands have succeeded in winning customer trust, which have failed, and why.

The World Federation of Advertisers has issued a call to action to the industry we all represent. It’s asking for ideas on six topics, which will be evaluated prior to the Global Marketer Week event in Lisbon, Portugal at the end of March.

As Marsha Appel points out, we have been here before. Direct-to-consumer (DTC) is not a new business model, it is an old one. What is different is the technology that facilitates the business model. What is not different is that people still buy the brands that are meaningful to them.  by Nigel Hollis

Whether purchasing recycled paper and plastic, eliminating toxic chemicals from products, or setting goals to reduce carbon emissions, a growing number of global brands have upped their games to meet the standards of environmental watchdogs and conscious consumers, as well as the social media armies that stand behind them.

Over the past few years, deep learning has gone from an esoteric branch of AI, focusing on theory, to being so mainstream that even an actress from Twilight has published an academic paper on it. This rise of deep learning over traditional machine learning methods has also led to the creation of a host of new platforms designed to help businesses improve work and work flow.

"The State of Data 2017" (published in December 2017 by Winterberry Group in partnership with DMA and IAB's Data Center of Excellence) revealed that U.S.- based marketers, publishers, and other data users invested $20.19BB on third-party audience data and related services and solutions in 2017.

Last year I wrote a lot about the erosion of the advertising bargain between advertisers and their audience. Without rehashing at length, let me summarize by simply stating that we no longer are as accepting of advertising because we now have a choice.

In a recent article on Campaign Live Rory Sutherland suggests that we all adopt “the efficiency bubble” to describe the way media logistics, not creativity, have come to dominate the conversation about advertising. But our fixation on efficiency is not just a bubble, it is a trap.  by Nigel Hollis

While disclosure continues to dominate the conversation around influencer marketing, data compliance laws are adding another layer of confusion—and cost—for those operating in this evolving market.

"Behind the Numbers" completes its investigation of sports streaming around the world with a look at two key Latin American markets, Brazil and Mexico. eMarketer's Paul Verna and Matteo Ceurvels discuss the platforms, popular sports and opportunities for marketers.

Digilant released a Top Programmatic Media Buying Trends of 2019 infographic. The exhibit outlines everything media buyers need to consider when planning media budgets for the year.

Companies spent more than $1 trillion globally on marketing in 2017, by one estimate. This puts chief marketing officers stewarding their brands squarely in the crosshairs of CEOs, CFOs and corporate boards, who want to know where all this money is going and what they’re getting in return—“brands be damned.”

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