With all of the attention paid to online beauty influencers, beauty brands may be missing out on a key target: mothers.

As I sat patiently through another irrelevant YouTube ad recently, I reflected on why so many ads fail to grab my attention or create a lasting impression. But in a world where marketers can create content for a few thousand dollars and ‘noise’ supersedes quality, why should they exercise caution? Everyone else is doing it so why shouldn’t they?  by Hannah Nicholl

As privacy concerns continue to rise, you’d think consumers would be dubious about sharing their data. But according to a number of surveys on the topic, that’s not necessarily the case—especially if they get some value out of it.

Consumption of long-form premium content has undergone a massive transformation in the digital age. Technology has given consumers the ability to watch what they want, where they want, whenever they want. Simultaneously, advertising technology has also allowed marketers to identify, target, and surround their audiences in these digital-first environments.

Measuring attribution and return on investment remains a key challenge when marketing with influencers—which means that it can be hard to quantify the merits of utilizing them. But neuroscience research from the UK, showing cognitive responses to traditional marketing vs. influencer posts, may provide some answers.

The consumer packaged goods (CPG) industry spends billions of dollars on traditional advertising such as TV, out-of-home (OOH) and print. But digital advertising is changing the way CPG brands market their products.

A combination of the emergence of big data, artificial intelligence and influential voices, such as Byron Sharp, calling for more scientific rigour have promoted the use of data to support marketing decision-making. But if the industry is to progress we need more than just data. We need understanding.  by Josh Samuel - Kantar / Global Head of Innovations

In the latest edition of its annual report, the Selig Center for Economic Growth at the University of Georgia’s business school pegged total buying power of the US Hispanic population at $1.539 trillion in 2018. Having added more than $500 billion since 2010, this figure is expected to grow nearly $400 billion more by 2023.

Currently, more than 64 million Hispanics live in the United States, making this group the second fastest-growing population segment since 2000, with 83% growth.

Currently, more than 19 million Non-Hispanic Asian & Pacific Islanders live in the United States, making this group the fastest-growing population segment since 2000, with 84% growth.

Despite strong results being realized by brands from location targeting advertising, nearly two-thirds of spend is still being wasted because of poor quality data and mistargeted location impressions.

By the year 2020, gen Z will account for 33 percent of the global population. Moreover, they already account for between $29 billion and $143 billion in consumer spending. It can be easy for marketers to assume they should be treating this burgeoning consumer group the same way they’ve treated millennials. However, early research is showing there are some key differences between the two demographics. In this presentation, we’ll cover four things your brand can do to position itself in the good graces of gen Z consumers.

America is responsible for nearly half (48%) of the world’s advertising spending. This is followed the closest by measured nations in Europe, which represent 30% of ad spending. Together, these two regions account for nearly 80% of Nielsen-estimated global advertising budget and are driving the most annual growth in these investments. You’d expect this wide reach to result in consumers addicted to the new products that surround them. But interestingly enough, compared to the rest of the world, consumers in these two regions are the least open to trying new things.

The average tenure for chief marketing officers of leading U.S. consumer brand companies decreased to 43 months from 44 months, according to the 15th annual CMO tenure study by leadership consulting firm Spencer Stuart.

It is very easy to think of brands as a fixed entity defined by a logo and a set of specific characteristics; however, because the real power of brands originates in people’s minds maybe we need to think about a brand as an evolving entity that morphs and changes over time. Our job as marketers is to shape that evolution to best grow sales.  by Nigel Hollis

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