As might be expected, mobile is a healthy part of the mix, with almost half of companies listing mobile commerce and payments as one of the top ecommerce activities they’re involved in, based on a new study.

More than half (52%) of US adults live in households with cellphones but no landline telephones, according to the latest GfK MRI Survey of the American Consumer®. That represents a doubling of the percentage since 2010, when it was 26%.

Nearly nine-in-ten Americans today are online, up from about half in the early 2000s. Pew Research Center has chronicled this trend and others through more than 15 years of surveys on internet and technology use.

After dropping to a three-year low last year, consumer purchases of smartphones are expected to rebound this year, fueled by better security, new functions, improved performance and device refresh schedules, a global Accenture survey finds.

Marketers have long wanted to get inside the heads of their customers. Getting onto the smartphones they hold in their hands may be the next best thing.  By Laura Beaudin, Wendy Grad, Elizabeth Spaulding and John Grudnowski

From conversations on the go to checking in on social media to navigating to destinations near and far, the accessibility of Smartphones has transformed how we live, work, and play.

Attention Marketing grew out of the rise of social media and smartly suggests that rather than interrupting the consumer and using SEM, SEO, bannAttention Marketing grew out of the rise of social media and smartly suggests that rather than interrupting the consumer and using SEM, SEO, banner ads, mobile ads, etc., brands have an opportunity to utilize social media to capture consumer’s attention and channeling this attention to the brand’s products when the consumer has a genuine interest in buying.er ads, mobile ads, etc., brands have an opportunity to utilize social media to capture consumer’s attention and channeling this attention to the brand’s products when the consumer has a genuine interest in buying.

With the rate of smartphone ownership in the U.S. continuing to climb, mobile has become a force to be reckoned within the world of digital advertising. While this boom is providing exciting opportunities for brands to reach many Americans, the mobile ad market’s rapid growth has raised questions as well, particularly around reaching the right consumers.

Some say talk is cheap, but data overages sure aren’t. Exceeding the limit on a smartphone data plan is a monthly headache for many Americans. However, that doesn’t stop consumers from using their phones round-the-clock to stream their favorite TV shows, download music and hail cars. Data has now become a huge, often costly, obstacle for consumers to overcome.

Many kids become internet users before they learn how to walk. But even as the age at which kids get a smartphone creeps downward, most lack one of their own, as explored in a new eMarketer report, “US Kids and Digital: Gauging How Digital These Digital Natives Really Are”.

When engaging consumers via mobile, the most personal of devices, marketers are advancing their strategies, says a new report from the Mobile Marketing Association (MMA). The report reveals a significant increase in spend and use of more data-centric approaches that impact ad delivery and creative.

Time and again, industry experts assert that mobile is a critical component of the marketing mix. Yet for all of the years it’s been “the year of mobile,” only 3% of brands’ marketing mix was spent on mobile advertising last year. Yes, marketers are increasing their mobile ad spend, but there is still a lot of ground to gain to catch up to consumer adopt

The Mobile Marketing Association (MMA) together with Kantar Millward Brown, released its 2016 Global Mobile Trends Report, the second annual and largest review of mobile campaigns.

Nearly one in five internet users around the world block ads, according to September 2016 research. That doesn’t necessarily mean they are averse to brand messaging, however.

With all the different types of social platforms out there, it can be challenging for brand marketers to decide when is the optimal time and day to post. According to H1 2016 research, on Facebook and Twitter, the best-performing posts were made in the evenings, and later in the work week.

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